GETTING STARTED (Please read this before starting on any of my recipes!)

This is merely a run-down of some general notes and recommendations that I often incorporate while making ramen.

Taking a glance at my recipes, you will quickly notice that they involve *days* worth of prep time in advance, careful temperature monitoring, etc. The most common snarky response that I see from skeptics alludes to “having to wait 4 days just for a bowl of soup”. That is simply not the case…Yes, from start to finish is about 4 days, however, you are going to be making enough for 8-12 bowls (depending on how much you like to eat per bowl, etc). Take a trip to a restaurant and you can easily spend $20 including tax + tip for ONE bowl. Many of the ingredients that I use last a long time, and do not require much per use, so the investment in equipment and ingredients will pay off. If you are interested in where to find any of the ingredients or equipment that I use, please do not hesitate to send me a message on the Contact page 🙂

That said, for the recipes themselves, I utilize the metric system. I use a ThermoPro cooking thermometer that allows me to toggle between Fahrenheit (°F) and Celsius (°C) degree readings. A digital scale should allow you to measure in grams (g) and kilograms (kg). Also, most measuring cups have millimeters (ml) and liters (L) displayed.

Equipment & Supplies needed to aid in preparation:
Measuring cup with metric display of millilitres (ml)
Saucepan
Tongs
Fine mesh strainer
Colander
Large bowl
Food thermometer with Celsius temperature display (°C)
Digital scale with grams (g) display
Aluminum stock pot(s)
Saran wrap
Foil
Whisk
Spatula
Frying pan
Sharpened knives (chef, paring, and utility)

Most of these items you will likely already have in your homes, so don’t worry!

I highly recommend using an aluminum stock pot for the soup stock versus stainless steel. Aluminum pots are less likely to scorch the cooking materials. For opaque, white tonkotsu broth, this is crucial.

OTHER HELPFUL TOOLS:
Cooking twine — to wrap the pork for chashu into a log shape
A tawashi — a natural scrubbing brush to aid in cleaning the pork bones
Fishing wire — allows for a clean, slicing-in-half of the ajitama

1 thought on “GETTING STARTED (Please read this before starting on any of my recipes!)”

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